Review: The Runes of Destiny (#2) by Christina Courtenay

Rating: 8.5/10

Synopsis:

Separated by time. Brought together by fate.

Indulging her fascination for the Viking language and losing herself in an archaeological dig is just what Linnea Berger needs after her recent trauma. Uncovering an exquisite brooch, she blacks out reading the runic inscription, only to come to, surrounded by men in Viking costume, who seem to take re-enactment very seriously.

Lost and confused, Linnea finds herself in the power of Hrafn, a Viking warrior who claims her as his thrall and takes her on a treacherous journey across the seas to sell her for profit. Setting sail, she confronts the unthinkable: she has travelled back to the ninth century.

Linnea is determined to find a way back to her own time, but there’s a connection forming with Hrafn. Can she resist the call of the runes and accept her destiny lies here…

Review:

The Runes of Destiny is a book that shall I say, is a sort of book that I wish to read more of? It’s in the same vein as Outlander that is for sure. I def enjoyed all the historical settings in this book. Hrafn was the best character, a stoic, noble, kind of man that would be perfect for anything if you gave him a role to do so. This book features some historical time-traveling elements, but it’s not so entirely magical. You’re always grounded that’s for certain. I can’t speak for the historical accuracy in this book, as I am no historian. But I was immersed in the characters, especially Linnea, as I loved her viewpoint a lot. In this book, you’ll travel through the cities of the Kievan Rus, and explore the fabled city of Byzantium (Which, I wished we had seen more of this in this novel)

I’m shipping the chemistry between Linnea and Hrafn. When I envision Hrafn, he reminds me of wearing a Suebian Knot and a German knotted beard reminiscent of the Germanic Peoples centuries ago. I also like how Christina showed the most boring aspects of Viking life and how Linnea as a woman, had to fit in with it. Because back in those times, the concept of equality for women just didn’t exist, or it didn’t exist specifically as spelled out. Women in notable positions of power, rich or poor, had an equal influence on men who were their husbands, fathers, sons. I am seeing this with Hrafn’s Aunt for certain.

That said, I would have wanted Hrafn to spend more time in the modern world and eventually discover what became of his homeland, etc. Of course, that could be breaking the rules of the time travel restraints that have been added here. Thure was a horrible man that should never have existed on the face of the planet, and he ended up becoming the half-brother of Hrafn. However, Hrafn is a shrewd businessman. Put him in modern times, and he could end up running a profitable company! While I loved Linnea’s family, I do wish we had seen a little more restraint when there’s the sort of ‘eventual’ mutual greeting between the past and the present, and that we would have had seen more of Linnea’s parents suddenly amazed and wonderous if they could too, travel back in time for research purposes (it’d certainly help!). Also, I think it’s time, that time travel novels should include people of the past getting to grips with 21st-century technology, especially social media. It would be so damn cool just to see that. Imagine if Hrafn started using it!

I enjoyed this novel a lot. It’s a fun ride, and I don’t take it too seriously from some of the gritter fantasy/sci-fi that I’ve read. It’s fun. And that’s what matters. Also, Kadir was the next best thing to happen in this novel, I want to see more of him! But is he from Serkland? I wonder if he’ll ever go back to the warm lands of the The Runes of Destiny is a book that shall I say, is a sort of book that I wish to read more of? It’s in the same vein as Outlander that is for sure. I def enjoyed all the historical settings in this book. Hrafn was the best character, a stoic, noble, kind of man that would be perfect for anything if you gave him a role to do so. This book features some historical time-traveling elements, but it’s not so entirely magical. You’re always grounded that’s for certain. I can’t speak for the historical accuracy in this book, as I am no historian. But I was immersed in the characters, especially Linnea, as I loved her viewpoint a lot. In this book, you’ll travel through the cities of the Kievan Rus, and explore the fabled city of Byzantium (Which, I wished we had seen more of this in this novel)

I’m shipping the chemistry between Linnea and Hrafn. When I envision Hrafn, he reminds me of wearing a Suebian Knot and a German knotted beard reminiscent of the Germanic Peoples centuries ago. I also like how Christina showed the most boring aspects of Viking life and how Linnea as a woman, had to fit in with it. Because back in those times, the concept of equality for women just didn’t exist, or it didn’t exist specifically as spelled out. Women in notable positions of power, rich or poor, had an equal influence on men who were their husbands, fathers, sons. I am seeing this with Hrafn’s Aunt for certain.

That said, I would have wanted Hrafn to spend more time in the modern world and eventually discover what became of his homeland, etc. Of course, that could be breaking the rules of the time travel restraints that have been added here. Thure was a horrible man that should never have existed on the face of the planet, and he ended up becoming the half-brother of Hrafn. However, Hrafn is a shrewd businessman. Put him in modern times, and he could end up running a profitable company! While I loved Linnea’s family, I do wish we had seen a little more restraint when there’s the sort of ‘eventual’ mutual greeting between the past and the present, and that we would have had seen more of Linnea’s parents suddenly amazed and wonderous if they could too, travel back in time for research purposes (it’d certainly help!). Also, I think it’s time, that time travel novels should include people of the past getting to grips with 21st-century technology, especially social media. It would be so damn cool just to see that. Imagine if Hrafn started using it!

I enjoyed this novel a lot. It’s a fun ride, and I don’t take it too seriously from some of the gritter fantasy/sci-fi that I’ve read. It’s fun. And that’s what matters. Also, Kadir was the next best thing to happen in this novel, I want to see more of him! But is he from Serkland? I wonder if he’ll ever go back to the warm lands of the Mediterranean. I loved it!